Rev. Dr. Todd Eklof

Channeling Your Inner Therapist: Techniques for Self Care and Fulfillment

If love, as Fromm says, includes a “sense of responsibility, care, respect, knowledge” of those we love, and if, it is not possible to love others without also loving ourselves, then it is necessary to take responsibility for our own well-being and unfolding. In this sermon we’ll explore some accessible ways of caring for ourselves. … Continued

December 24, 2018 Cosmic Advent 6:00 – 7:30 PM

Our annual candlelight service utilizing traditional Christmas hymns, readings from a variety of religions, and short homilies to help us celebrate the miracle of every birth and the birth of the Universe itself.

Yes, Einstein there is a Santa Claus

Services are held at 9:15 & 11:00 a.m. each Sunday. Grandma doesn’t have to get run over by a reindeer to prove the existence of Santa Claus. Science provides all the clues we need to believe it possible for a man to travel round the world and visit the home of every child in a … Continued

The Future and the Measure of All Things

Services are held at 9:15 & 11:00 a.m. each Sunday. In this final sermon of the series, I’ll wrap it up by imagining what the world might look like if human society were to adopt the humanistic ethic, and wonder if we will have an opportunity to get there, to fully mature as a species, … Continued

God Where are You? A Little About My Theological Odyssey

Services are held at 9:15 & 11:00 a.m. each Sunday. It’s understandable upon learning I’m a minister that most presume I must be a “believer.” Western religion, after all, is almost synonymous with theology. One’s religion, that is, is determined by one’s beliefs about God. These days atheism is becoming increasingly acceptable but being both a minister and an atheist still seems contradictory. In this sermon I’ll wrestle with this contradiction by talking about the evolution of my own theological beliefs.

Reason and the Measure of All Things

Services are held at 9:15 & 11:00 a.m. each Sunday. The ability to reason has long been considered one of the fundamental qualities distinguishing human beings from other animals. While some other animals also demonstrate rudimentary forms of reasoning, and humans don’t always use this power effectively or often enough, learning to reason well could fundamentally transform human relations.

The Singularity and Me:Reflections on My Recent Class at Singularity University

Services are held at 9:15 & 11:00 a.m. each Sunday. Upon delivering this sermon I will have freshly returned from a weeklong class at Singularity University on, “Preparing Global Leaders & Organizations for the Future.” The course promises to help students, “Explore the opportunities and implications of exponential technologies and connect to a global ecosystem that is shaping the future and solving the world’s most urgent problems.”

The Wisdom to Know the Difference: Distinguishing between What We Can and Can’t Control

Services are held at 9:15 & 11:00 a.m. each Sunday. In this sermon we’ll more closely examine the “dichotomy of control,” a fundamental principle of Stoic philosophy. The first line of Reinhold Niebuhr’s Serenity Prayer is familiar to most; “God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; courage to change the things I can; and wisdom to know the difference.” Often it is knowing the difference that is the most important and most difficult of all.

Citizenship and the Measure of All Things

Services are held at 9:15 & 11:00 a.m. each Sunday. It seems most people are defined considerably by where they are from, not as much by what they are—humans. Like so much in our personal lives, our provincial origins add to our uniqueness, but should in no way be considered more important than our membership in the human family at large. In this sermon, we’ll consider what it means to belong in this world through the ethic of human welfare and individual fulfillment.